BEST Sushi So Far In Osaka and a Quick Visit to Nara – Japanese Food Travel in Osaka!

BEST Sushi So Far In Osaka and a Quick Visit to Nara - Japanese Food Travel in Osaka!
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► Check out our Osaka Food Guide for details on restaurants in these videos: http://migrationology.com/2015/09/osaka-food-guide-japan/

On Day 12 in Osaka, Japan, we decided to first take a quick day trip to Nara, a city that’s about a 45 minute train ride from Osaka. We then returned to Osaka, and had some of the finest sushi I had during my trip there.

00:27 Trip to Nara – Nara is an old and historical town in Japan, not far from Osaka and Kyoto. It’s very easy to get there by public transportation. The first thing you’ll notice as soon as you arrive to Nara are the deer – they are free roaming all over the city, and people love to interact with them.

2:48 Todai-ji Temple – 500 JPY ($4.17) – One of the biggest and most famous temples in Nara is the Todai-ji Temple, and although it was intensely busy, we decided to pay the entrance fee and go inside. It was good to see, but it was a very busy day that we visited.

4:09 Lunch at Happoh Restaurant (和食屋 八寶) – After walking around Nara for a while, we headed back towards the train station, and had lunch at a restaurant called Happoh Restaurant (和食屋 八寶). The food was alright, but not the best. We then took the train back to Osaka to do some shopping and eating.

6:15 Tenjinbashisuji Shotengai – Tenjinbashisuji Shotengai is the longest shopping street in Japan, and it goes on for something like 2.6 km. We got back to Osaka, and walked around this area, before eating some amazing sushi.

7:23 Harukoma Sushi (春駒 支店) – While walking around the shopping market, I noticed a line of people, all waiting for a turn to get into Harukoma Sushi (春駒 支店), a famous sushi restaurant in Osaka. I had researched this restaurant and had wanted to eat here, but I didn’t know when we were going to get there, or where it was – but we stumbled into it, and decided to go straight in line to eat there. The sushi turned out to be some of the best sushi I had in Osaka. It wasn’t fancy, but it was good quality, big pieces of sushi and fish, and it felt like we were at a fish market. Awesome sushi, good prices, and friendly service.

Read more about this restaurant on my blog: http://migrationology.com/2015/09/osaka-food-guide-japan/

That was all for Day 12 in Osaka – it was another good day, and the sushi was the highlight for me.

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This Japan food and travel video was made by Mark and Ying Wiens.

► Check out our blogs here: Mark: http://migrationology.com/ Ying: http://travelbyying.com/

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About the Author: Mark Wiens

40 Comments

  1. Its called Somen,are very thin noodles made of wheat flour,less than 13 mm in diameter.It is used extensively throughout East Asian Cuisines.The most common example is Japanese somen and the noodles are usually served cold with soy sauce and dashi dipping sauce,similar to mori soba noodles style.

  2. Its so beatiful there i mean down to the trees the structure i love mark u take me on a journey every night. I binge watch faithfully 2am-until 7ish am

  3. Not slot machines ( Pachinko ), however, it’s a grey area as far as the casino aspect. Gambling in Japan is for the most part illegal. But, Japan has many incongruous aspects to its society and laws. In the pachinko parlor as their known you may claim prizes after turning in your “balls”…But, in lieu of those you can get tickets, go outside to a discreet window, press a button, and slide your money to whomever is in there and Yen is returned…So, in the formal sense it’s illegal to gamble on the premises, but a loophole in the laws allows you to get cash instead of “prizes”. Hence the popularity of Pachinko in Japan. I was moderately successful playing pachinko and it’s more of a game of skill than luck, but it doesn’t hurt!

  4. I will never understand the thumbs down for Mark's videos!!! He's so nice and quite intelligent. His videos are very interesting and I watch them with my kids. They love Mark and his family. Thumbs up every time Mark. Keep it up!!!!!!!

  5. Those sites are expensive, but I think well worth the price, soo beautiful to look at. Also the "Casino" on that shopping street is a room full of Pachinko machines. That is a ball bearing game that looks like part pinball machine and part, The Price is Rights calls a "Pinko" game. You shoot the ball bearings into a maze of pins and points are given, depending on where they end up at the bottom. Fun game, but addictive.

  6. You should research Ama Abalone divers , They are seasonal so you can plan ahead for spring , This abalone is prized in japan and very expensive. The Ama divers are all older woman and they are trained to dive without tanks , free diving only to get abalone

  7. Hello Mark, watching your Osaka food tour is really cool I love Japan and the foods you ate looked so unbelievably delicious I am a few years late to watch this video but that was really cool to see your experience in Osaka 👌🍱✌

  8. The only reaction I can see in ur face is closing ur eyes and go down and the only thing I wished you'd do is banging ur head on that table for ur same boring reaction…god!

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