Crow's new wing lets it fly once more! – Animal rescue

Crow's new wing lets it fly once more! - Animal rescue
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As many of our avian patients can stress very easily in captivity, imping (the process of transplanting feathers from a donor wing onto a damaged bird) has become quite a common procedure here.

This crow was brought into the centre after being found in a Larsen trap. Whilst the trap itself was perfectly legal, the bird was in poor condition and had clipped feathers on one wing – a violation of animal welfare laws.

Luckily, Maru was able to repair the damaged wing using feathers from a donor wing and the crow was soon able to take the skies once more!

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40 Comments

  1. Being a wild-bird rehabilitator in the US and a corvid specialist i commend you for this incredible procedure… it's is wonderful to known that special individuals like yourselves make a difference and perpetuate "The Circle of Life." Thank you for all the great work and videos shared!

  2. It can't be very often that you glue your patients together! What an ingenious procedure. I thought you would glue a feather on to the short feather, but how perfect that you can use the fact that the 'pen' is hollow to attach them together! It's like one of those modeling toys where you have to put different pieces together. Crows are awesome. (Even if they bite, hehe.)

  3. Corvidaes are my favorite family of birds next to parrots, so intelligent and emotional, I'm sure this crow will always remember you guys and if you're ever in his neck of the woods again, might come say hello! Corvids never forget a face, good or bad after all.

  4. It is great that the crow's wing could be repaired, but what happened to the donor from whose wing the feathers were taken? Was it even alive when the feathers were taken from it for the donation?

  5. I knew clipping is now illegal. But wow, I didn't realise there are feather transplants. That's amazing! There's always something fascinating to learn from this channel! I hope Simon's hand/arm heals quick ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤

  6. Someone should make a compilation video of all the times Simon gets pinched, bitten or wacked by a rescue animal. I just love the way he sweetly asks the animal to please stop while it as a "you see this? Don't mess with me. I'M FEARLESS" expression on its face. This channel will always make me smile 🙂

  7. I love the work that you do and I applaud it. I also support wildlife conservation. BUT I do not believe that the amount of time, effort, and expense on this one crow was worth it. There are no shortage of crows, and they are in the category of "Least Concern" for conservation as their population are increasing.

  8. I remember when you guys did this with a buzzard, it was amazing, I didn't know that was possible. It's great to see another bird getting the treatment 😊 Sorry you got bit though.

  9. So amazing! Wonderful work, Crew! Thanks so much! These videos are always my go-to just before bedtime. Guarantees sweet dreams of happy animals and pastures of wildflowers.💐

  10. Who ever has trapped and damaged the bird deserves punishment .. Meanwhile thanks goodness for the wonders of modern veterinary medicine and WAF ..Here's hoping the bird steers clear of any more vile traps *

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